TARCC Researcher PubMed Links PDF Print E-mail
More than two dozen researchers at  major medical research institutions in Texas are participating in the collaborative Alzheimer's research work of the Texas Alzheimer's Research and Care Consortium.  Their efforts are coordinated by a TARCC Steering Committee representing Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, and Texas A & M Health Science Center in Bryan.

Click on the PubMed links provided below for an up-to-date listing of these researchers’ publications on Alzheimer’s disease and other areas of research interest.

Researcher


Barber, Robert C., Ph.D.

PubMed

Chan, Wenyaw, Ph.D.

PubMed

Cooke, Norma, Ph.D.

PubMed

Cullum, Munro, Ph.D.

PubMed

Doody, Rachelle, M.D., Ph.D.

PubMed

Fairchild, Thomas, Ph.D.

PubMed

Gong, Gordon, Ph.D.

PubMed

Grammas, Paula, Ph.D.

PubMed

Hall, James, Ph.D.

PubMed

Huebinger, Ryan, Ph.D.

PubMed

Kenan, Mary M., M.D.

PubMed

Knebl, Janice, D.O.

PubMed

Lacritz, Laura, Ph.D.

PubMed

Massman, Paul, Ph.D.

PubMed

 

Researcher


Momeni, Parastoo, Ph.D.

PubMed

O’Bryant, Sid E., Ph.D.

PubMed

Pavlik, Valory, Ph.D.

PubMed

Reisch, Joan S., Ph.D.

PubMed

Rosenberg, Roger, M.D.

PubMed

Rountree, Susan, M.D.

PubMed

Royall, Don, M.D.

PubMed

Schrimsher, Gregory, Ph.D.

PubMed

Sohrabji, Farida, Ph.D.

PubMed

Szigeti, Kinga, M.D.

PubMed

Weiner, Myron, M.D.

PubMed

Wilhelmsen, Kirk, M.D., Ph.D.

PubMed

Williams, Benjamin, Ph.D.

PubMed

Xiao, Gungua, Ph.D.

PubMed

Zhang, Yan, Ph.D.

PubMed

 





Texas Alzheimer’s Research and Care Consortium

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Alzheimer's Facts

From 2000-2010, death rates have declined for most major diseases – heart disease (-16 percent), breast cancer (-2 percent), prostate cancer (-8 percent), stroke (-23 percent) and HIV/AIDS (-42 percent) while Alzheimer’s disease deaths rose 68 percent, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.