Alzheimers Informational Websites
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1 Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center (ADEAR)
Comprehensive Alzheimer's disease information and resources from the National Institute on Aging.
2 Alzheimer's Research Forum
A source of what's new in Alzheimer's research and drug development.
3 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid & Nursing Home Comparison
Provides detailed information about the past performance of every Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing home in the country.
4 Family Caregiver Alliance, National Center on Caregiving
A source of information on services, education, research, and advocacy for caregivers.
5 Legal Hotline for Older Texans
Offers legal advice and referrals to Texans age 60 and older, focusing primarily on low income clients with limited access to other sources of legal help. Staff and volunteer attorneys can advise eligible clients on how to obtain Medicaid, food stamps, elderly housing assistance, SSI and other benefits -- and can help with debt collection, advance planning and estate planning issues, powers of attorney, and housing and consumer problems. This service is funded by the Texas Department of Aging and the State Bar of Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation.
6 Medicare Clearinghouse
Official U.S. government site for information on Medicare eligibility, enrollment, and premiums; includes search tools for state-specific information on health plan choices, nursing home comparisons, prescription drug programs, participating physicians, and plan coverage.
7 Medicare - General Information
General information on Medicare and Medicaid.
8 National Association of Area Agencies on Aging
Provides an Eldercare Locator, a free national service linking older adults and their family caregivers to aging information and resources in their own communities.
9 National Council on Aging: BenefitsCheckUp
BenefitsCheckUp, provided by the National Council on Aging, is the nation's most comprehensive web-based service to screen for benefits programs for seniors with limited income and resources.
10 National Family Caregiver Support Program
Resources for caregivers addressing finances, personal stress and health, caregiver support programs and activities, and website links to connect with other caregivers. Site is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
11 National Institute on Aging
Source of information on Alzheimer's disease and aging-related research projects sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
12 Older Drivers Project, American Medical Association
Guide to help assess the skills of older drivers; includes resources to help patients and caregivers learn about driving safety and alternatives to driving.
13 Safe Return Program
Information on enrollment in MedicAlert and Safe Return programs to provide immediate assistance and access to vital medical information when an Alzheimer's patient wanders or is lost.
14 Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS)
Provides information on sources of care for the elderly, Medicaid and Medicare, paying for care, and prescription drug assistance.
15 Texas Department of Aging: State Inspection & Quality Ratings for Long-Term Care Facilities and Home Health Agencies
Provides state inspection and quality ratings for facilities and agencies working with older clients.
16 Texas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program
Advocates for quality of life and care for residents in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Ombudsmen are mandated by law to identify, investigate and resolve complaints made by, or on behalf of, residents and to provide services to help in protecting their health, safety, and welfare.





Texas Alzheimer’s Research and Care Consortium

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Alzheimer's Facts

Long-term nursing home care is costly and can easily drain one’s finances in a short period of time.  In 2011, the average cost for a private room in a nursing home was $248 per day, or $90,520 per year. The average cost of a semi-private room in a nursing home was $222 per day, or $81,030 per year.  Approximately 80 percent of nursing homes that provide care for people with Alzheimer’s disease charge the same rate regardless of whether or not the individual has Alzheimer’s.